Cache Update

Remember the pretty little cache pot I created a while back? Well it had a little defect. You see the lid fit so snugly that when you went to remove it you had to hold the pot itself to pry it open. And when it did open the motion created caused the contents already inside to move. Sometime so much that they escaped – onto the person opening it. That’s why my pretty copper canister became cabinet top décor and a replacement was found.

Shortly after we moved to the mainland I purchased this ice bucket at JoAnns on clearance for something like $5. And then I never used it.

Cache

Since my inspiration to DIY a cache pot in the first place came from an ice bucket I decided to give it a try and set it out on the counter for a test run. It was easy to open – just lift the lid. It was easy to clean – just pull out the insert dump and put in the dishwasher. And it was the perfect size. Unfortunately, it wasn’t the perfect color. But that’s nothing a coat of spray paint can’t fix.

Cache

A few coats of spray later and wha-la, I have a new cache pot! Plus because I already had the bucket and the spray paint it didn’t cost me a dime! I’m still not crazy about the stars, so I might rig something to cover those, but for a totally free project I’m not gonna complain.

The Easiest Pinterest Project To Date

Remember that pretty copper pot I thrifted a little while back?  I finally got around to converting it into my cache pot for the kitchen and it was seriously so easy I barely really don’t have much to explain.  I followed the steps I found on this DIY post and I think it took me all of 10 minutes!  So without further ado, here’s the how-to in just 4 easy steps.

Gather the supplies: container and charcoal filter.
Step 1: Gather the supplies – container and charcoal filter.
Step 2: Cut filter in half and prep with glue dots.
Step 2: Cut filter in half and prep with glue dots.

 

Step 3: Attach filter to underside of container lid.
Step 3: Attach filter to underside of container lid.
Step 4: Put lid on container and sit back to appreciate your handiwork!
Step 4: Put lid on container and sit back to appreciate your handiwork!

And that’s it!  My pretty kitchen scrap pot is ready to collect trimmings for a future compost pile.  Until then it holds the things I’d rather not put into our new septic system.  For now, when it’s full I wander out into the woods on our property and dump the contents in random places so if wildlife do sniff it out, it’s never in the same area and they don’t become accustom to eating scraps.

I could have saved the other half of the filter for when this one wears out in 3 months, but instead I put it on the underside of our regular trash can lid to help with the odors that tend to accumulate there and I’m pleased to report that it seems to be helping!

So there you have it.  Easy Peasy, Cache Teesy! 🙂