New DIY Shelves for Crafting Storage

This project had been bouncing around in my head for quite some time, so when the Hubs was in the mood for a project I decided it was the perfect opportunity to direct his motivation to this update.  I’d previously had a ladder shelf in this spot holding all my crafting projects, but it wasn’t super sturdy and it didn’t really fit my style so I wanted to replace it with an industrial style rolling bookcase.  I showed the Hubs this and this style to give him an idea of what I wanted and we talked through the pros and cons of the two.  He took a few measurements and within two days I had this beauty.

I forgot to get a picture of it as bare wood, but I’m sure you can imagine it.  This is what it looked like with two coats of the same grey stain I used on the barn wood frames he made me. He spray painted the metal corner brackets he’d picked up for the project and added those to complete the look.  And here it is all filled and in use!

With the new shelves done I was finally ready to hang the “create” art I got forever ago.  It looks great with the shelves and coordinates with the dark bed frame and baskets.  Now that it’s up I’ll have to share the story behind it soon.

My often used paints and stains found a home on the top shelf for easy access.  I reused the baskets I already had and filled in the extra spot with a gym basket I already had as well.

I’m still debating painting the screw  heads on the corner brackets, so I’ll live with it for a while and if it bothers me in a few weeks I’ll make them match.  The Hubs also got wooden dowels to make faux steel rods along the back of the shelves like the inspiration pieces had, but we haven’t added them yet.  I really liked that detail, but because I’m using baskets rather than styling it with decor they wouldn’t be super noticeable, so it may not be worth doing.  I’ll decide on that eventually. 🙂

This whole area has seen several updates since we moved in 4 years ago including revamping the shelvespainting the cart knobs, adding the craft paper rollmoving the day bed out to this space and adding the DIY frame.  I’m loving how it’s all looking together.  And how it compliments the wall-to-wall desk on the other side of the room, which has also seen several updates since this post.  I’ll have to share that soon!

If you’re looking for more tutorials for these style of shelves, check here, here, here, here and here.  It’s a popular style so there are many variations available out there.  I hope yours turns out great!

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DIY Faux Barnwood Frames

I recently picked up two great prints from one of my fave Alaskan artists thanks to a promotional sale she was running.  But I wanted rustic frames for them.  I tried a few from the local stores, but they either didn’t fit the prints the way I wanted or weren’t rustic enough.  So I turned to Etsy, where I found several options but again wasn’t sure on the sizing.  The Hubs overheard my frustration trying to confirm size and shipping costs, looked at the styles I was considering and then proclaimed, “I can make that.”  I quickly said OK! and searched Pinterest for a tutorial.  I found this one and made adjustments for the size of our prints.

I somehow forgot to get a picture of the frames before I stained them but I’m sure you can imagine it.  Here’s how they looked after the first coat of stain.

I used stain I had on hand from a previous project.  While it was pretty it wasn’t quite barnwood enough for me so I decided to add some grey I also had on hand.

And here’s the result!  We both love how it turned out.  I had a few spots still to touch up, but this was pretty darn close to what I’d been looking at on Etsy.  It wasn’t true barn wood, but at an investment of around $13/frame it gave me the look I wanted without extra shipping costs.  Plus it was the perfect custom size for what I needed.

And here it is with the print attached.  I just taped it to the back using the backing board that came with the print so I didn’t damage the print itself.

It’s the perfect piece to complete this area which I’ve been slowly revamping for quite a while now.  And there’s a sneak peek at the other project the Hubs did for me recently!  I’ll be sharing that very soon.

The second print is much more colorful and really pops with the rustic tones of the wood.  I hung this one in my cubicle at work and have gotten so many compliments on it.  It makes me smile every day, both because I love the art and knowing the love that went into the frame surrounding it. 🙂

So if you’re looking for a rustic frame I highly recommend this one.  It was simple and easy to do – just 1×2’s, L brackets and some stain.  I’d love to see what you come up with if you give it a try!

Our Scotland Adventure – Day 7

Our last day in Scotland was spent back in Edinburgh.  We had run out of time to see Holyrood Palace on Day 2 so that was the goal for today – and to handle the parking ticket we got while at Edinburgh Castle.  This time though we opted to leave the car at the hotel and take the bus into town.  I was quite excited to ride the double decker buses since we don’t have those here, so of course we immediately went upstairs upon boarding.  We sat toward the back and enjoyed seeing the sights as we headed into town rather than navigating the streets and GPS.

There were grand old homes turned into B&Bs or businesses.

And important looking structures like this one.

When the seats up front became available we moved up and enjoyed views like this as we watched traffic go past.

There were also numerous shop windows to take in.

It was a relatively short ride to reach the area near the magistrate’s office where we had to go to contest the ticket.  Once off the bus we got our bearings and soon realized we had to climb these stairs to get to the right street.

We took a short breather at the mid-way point to peek in the windows of the shops along the way.  I had to wonder how they handled deliveries of goods, but I guess that’s just part of the usual routine in this area.

The stairs took us to the Royal Mile, just down from the castle.  We were still a few blocks from the parking office, so we headed that direction as we enjoyed the sights.

Including architecture like this!

And shop windows like this.  I seriously considered buying that dress for my company holiday party, but didn’t think the Hubs would be up for the matching kilt!

After a couple mis-turns we found the right office to contest our ticket, spoke to the officials and learned that we had parked in an area where you have to have a special resident permit, not just the kiosk permit.  They told us we could appeal the ticket with a written statement and explain that we were tourists and hadn’t understood the difference.  We wrote up our statement and submitted it along with our contact information back home in case they had any questions.  Then we headed back out to the Royal Mile to make our way to Holyrood.  Having handled the pressing item of the day we were both in lighter spirits and totally got a chuckle out of this display!

Several shops had unique and clever names like this one.

And there were several more picturesque spots like this little alleyway, where I could envision Belle walking along reading a book.

I spotted this sign and had to pause, since I grew up on a Manse Rd.  I’d always figured it was a family name but never thought about it being older than that.

Along the Royal Mile I spotted this guy in one of the shop windows and fell in love.  So we stepped inside to find out how much he was.  It turned out he was quite heavy as he was constructed to be a door stop, but they had other similar designs as pillows and ornaments.

They also had this amazing Highland Coo bag that I had to have.  I offered to get one for my sister, but she turned it down – much to her disappointment when she saw mine in person later!

I also eyed this pretty scarf, but it was a bit beyond my budget so I got a picture instead.

We were getting hungry after our trek down the Royal Mile so we decided to stop and eat before getting to the castle.  We ducked into a quaint little pub, which we soon learned was the Tolbooth Tavern – full of history and stories.  We ordered and were pleased to see the hearty meals that were presented.

I had a few giggles watching the Hubs try to eat this massive burger without getting it all over himself.  I’m pleased to say that he did a pretty good job!

We walked off our food comas with the remaining blocks to Holyrood, where we quickly toured the gift shop and purchased our entrance tickets.  The courtyard in front of the palace has a magnificent fountain with ornate carvings of several historical Scottish figures.

There were dragons and lovers, and of course unicorns – the official animal of Scotland.

The palace had several impressive details like the stone carvings and gilded lanterns on the front wall.

Across the courtyard I spotted these cross windows.  I’m not sure what room they were for inside the wall but it was quite an interesting design that took countless hours of crafstmanship.

Photography is not allowed inside the palace, but the exterior gave plenty to take in.

After touring the palace, including the apartments of Mary, Queen of Scots, where David Rizzio had been murdered we made our way over to the abby ruins.  They were absolutely stunning.

These stone caskets were likely pulled from the sealed tombs within the abby when it was raided.  We headed out into the Queen’s gardens and made our way around the outside of the abby.

It was a beautiful landscape, where a giant jubilee is held each year.  I was so enamored with the gardens that I didn’t notice the stone ruins on the hillside beyond until I was editing these images!  The large crag behind the palace is Arthur’s Seat.

We sat for a bit just taking in the grounds and the history in this place, then made our way along the path to the exit.

On our way back to the bus station we stopped to see the Scott Monument, a victorian monument to Scottish author, Sir Walter Scott.  Luckily, it was just a few blocks from our bus stop so it wasn’t far out of the way since we were quite tired from all the walking we’d done that day.

We took in the skylines of the city as we boarded the bus, knowing these would be our last glimpses of the city and it’s history.

The ride itself was very entertaining as the buses, kept stopping so close to each other that we made noises each time and then giggled.  Just to give you an idea of how close they get there was only inches between them at this stop.

Back at the hotel we asked our new friend Steven, who works as a concierge, where the best nearby spot to go for dinner was.  I was wanting fish and chips for my last night and he drove us to a spot just a few miles away that did to-go orders.  With fish and chips and a Greek gyro in hand we grabbed a cab back to the hotel to rest our feet and dig in.  It was the perfect ending to our trip.

The next morning was rainy and gloomy as we headed to the airport.  But the rain did have an upside – I finally got a full shot of the Edinburgh sign without gaggles of tourists on it.

We lugged our very stuffed suitcases into the terminal and checked in as we thought about the wonderful trip we’d had.  It’s been fun reliving it through these posts and I hope it inspires you to go see some of these amazing places.  We’ll definitely be back again at some point!

Check out our other Scotland adventures:

And our travels through Iceland on the same trip with Day 1, Day 2, Day 3 and Day 4.

Our Scotland Adventure – Day 6 continued

Our Day 6 adventures continued with a drive into Cumbria in northern England to see Hadrain’s Wall.  This area was once the edge of the Roman Empire and the wall was built by the Roman emperor Hadrian.  Theories vary as to why the wall was built – defense, immigration & customs or just a show of power, but the fact that portions of it remain today is a lasting testament to their strength.  The wall extended over 70 miles at it’s completion with garrison towers along it’s length.  The first area we stopped at still had the foundations of one of these towers.

The view from the location was stunning and strategic.  Today the wall is surrounded by fields of grazing livestock, which belie the tumultuous history of the region.

The thickness of the walls was impressive, especially when you consider that they were created by hand without modern machinery.  Many areas of the wall have been robbed of their stones over the centuries as new structures were built in the region.

Today’s roadway follows alongside the wall in many places.  Here the local vegetation has created an archway bridging today and the past in another way.

We continued up the road to a visitor center at a key point along the wall.  This spot was the location of the Birdoswald fort where regiments would have been stationed and trained.  Today it is the longest surviving stretch of the wall.

At the heart of the fort’s footprint is a house constructed centuries after the empire fell during the Victorian era.  The house and estate were purchased during the 1840’s by Henry Norman, who had a strong interest in the fort and it’s history.  He was the first person to employ archaeologist to conduct excavations on the site.  He added the tower and porch to the farmhouse to give it a medieval style as was fashionable at the time.

Beneath the lawn of the house were the foundations of several of the fort’s key buildings, including the granaries and garrison hall where the soldiers would train.  The excavated foundations of these structures are marked out with posts today.

From the house you can see where the fort gates had been in the distance.  Signage shows what they would have looked like when it was at it’s height of use during the Roman occupation.

Because we arrived late in the day the fort was closing shortly after we arrived, so we saw what we could and then headed back the way we had come to check out a cool looking spot I’d seen on the way in.  This stone archway marked the entrance to the area, which turned out to be Lanercoast Priory, an ancient monastery.

Due to the time of day, everything at the site was closed so we enjoyed touring the grounds instead.  The east end of the church is still functioning and was under restoration near the entrance.

I discovered these stone steps along the wall coming off the church and decided to explore.  Beyond the wall was an ancient cemetery with rows and rows of aged headstones.  Some were washed plain by the elements, while others retained their medieval style.

From the cemetery you can see the damaged section of the priory, which has been left open.  The structure is massive and absolutely stunning from every angle.

We walked around the building to the other side where we had a fuller view of the entire complex, including foundations of areas that no longer stand.

Beyond this fence was yet another field of grazing sheep, completely oblivious to the history and beauty that surrounded them.

We headed back toward our vehicle at the front of the church where there were a few smaller buildings that looked like row houses.  I felt like I’d stepped into the pages of a storybook and had been transported back in time.

The signage nearby gave an aerial view of the buildings and described how it had been converted to a grand residence after the Reformation.

On the other side of the estate was a shop and tea room, which were also closed.  I was pretty bummed and wished we’d stopped here first before going up to Birdoswald so I could have browsed their wares.  What I could see through the windows certainly looked like my style!  There was also an outdoor eating area that I’m sure is fantastic to enjoy during the warmer months.

Signs in front of the shop described local sights and history.  As I wandered past the outdoor eating area along the parking lot I spotted this pretty little alley way which continued the storybook look.

On the far side of the parking lot was a large stone home, which I discovered was a B&B.  It too was closed but it was still lovely to see from the outside.

With the light fading we made our way back toward Edinburgh for the night.  Along the way we enjoyed several European road signs we spotted, which created a few chuckles about how different they were from American road signs and yet so similar.

We also had fun noticing the different truck rigs, which included extra tall loads, rounded top trailers and a triple-decker car hauler!

Because the Hubs has an American CDL we had been noticing the differences in rigs here the entire trip, along with how they handle the narrow roads and tight quarters.  On several occasions we spotted trucks stopped on the wrong side of the road unloading, but this one we spotted on the way into Cumbria was actually disconnected and LEFT on the road.  The local drivers seemed used to this behavior and just made their way around the obstacle as they could but we certainly got a big chuckle out of it and had a lively conversation about how that would never happen in the US.

We also spotted several fun displays along the highways including this hay bale Bo Peep and her sheep!

It had been a long but wonderful day and we were ready to rest when we reached Edinburgh.  We had one day left and were going to make the most of it playing tourist with a trip into the heart of the city.

Check out our other Scotland adventures:

And our travels through Iceland on the same trip with Day 1, Day 2, Day 3 and Day 4.

Our Scotland Adventure – Day 6

Welcome to Day 6 of our Scotland adventures, which was set aside for the famous Rosslyn Chapel.  Owned by the St. Clair family, the chapel was built as a place of worship for the family.  It fell into disrepair after the Reformation and actually served as stables for Oliver Cromwell’s army when they attacked Rosslyn Castle.  Queen Victoria later visited the site and declared that it aught to be preserved for the country, so it was rededicated and repairs began.  The site became a tourist destination after The Da Vinci Code book and subsequent movie were released which feature the chapel as the ending point of the story’s elaborate scavenger hunt through history.

While we were able to tour the inside of the chapel and see the numerous intricate carvings they do not allow photography on the interior, so I can’t share any of those amazing sights.  But we did make a full lap of the exterior of the chapel so I have several of those to share.

This is the doorway that Tom Hanks and Audrey Tautou enter in The Da Vinci Code.  They also filmed in the tombs below the chapel’s altar but did modify the space a bit to fit the story line.

This is the back side of the chapel which faces away from the recently constructed visitor center.

This side door was originally used as the ladies’ entrance when men and women were required to used separate entrances and worship in segregated sections of the building.

Signage outside the chapel showcased the history of the site and the architecture of the structure.  It is believed that the original plans were for the chapel to be larger with a cross shape, but when the founder of the chapel, William St. Clair died construction ceased.

Inside the visitor center the displays decode some of the numerous carvings inside the chapel.  When the chapel was built many people could not read, but the carvings told visual stories designed to provide moral instruction.  The story of the Apprentice Pillar told by one of the hosts while we were inside the chapel was one of the most interesting to me.

Although just a short walk from the chapel, the Rosslyn Castle ruins are not open to the public so having seen the chapel, we headed off to our next destination – the Secret Herb Garden.

The Hubs discovered this little gem online and knew I’d enjoy stopping here.  He was 100% right!  The rustic seating area in front of the building certainly spoke to me but the chilly fall temps led us inside to find lunch.

The simple herb displays as you approached the door were super adorable and may just need to be recreated for our deck this summer. 😉

Inside we were greeted with a quaint little shop and eatery which serves simple fares made with local produce and ingredients.

I was quite tempted by these lovely cakes at the register but opted to order the tomato soup instead, with a cupcake for desert.

While we waited for our food I browsed the displays, which featured gardening wares, pottery, artwork and even a few decor items.  This is where I found the plaid pillow that is now in our guest room.

This little stool really called my name and I seriously debated bringing it home, but ultimately decided to pass since our we had already added a suitcase to our luggage collection on the trip!

Our lunch was delicious – literally the best tomato soup I’ve ever had.  The Hubs tried a quiche with salad and said it was quite good as well.  The Summer House lemonade we discovered here was so good I had to get another before we left so I could enjoy it on the road.

Plus the lovely fresh blooms on the table made everything even better.

And that cupcake…. yeah it was fantastic as well.  I wish I’d asked for the recipe!

After eating we toured the grounds where I spotted numerous items I’d love to have carted home to my garden!

This metal fire stand was exactly like the ones I’d seen at several of the castles we’d toured and I literally drooled envisioning it filled with trailing flowers in my yard.  It honestly hurt to walk away from it knowing it was too big to take home.

Inside the green house I discovered another amazing seating area, perfect for groups and fun parties.  There were several table setups throughout the green house, each surrounded by the lush plants.

This bank of cosmos brought so much color and fragrance to this little area and I was thrilled to see several other varieties of flowers like this dahlia still blooming so late in the season.

I wandered the paths of the green house noting how they had the plants arranged in various ways throughout the space, including a growing wall which seemed to be doing quite well.

I also spotted several wicker forms around the green house that added a bit of whimsy and charm to the setting.  I may try to recreate the triangular design to act as supports for my taller flowers this summer.

Behind the green house was another courtyard space.  This one was bordered by raised beds and a lovely wicker style trellis.  I’d love to create something similar to this when I develop the lower area of our yard in the next year or two!

There was also this interesting little guest house, created from a large tank.  Dubbed “The Tub” it fit the setting perfectly and was a fun way to reuse material into something functional beyond it’s intended purpose.

The building behind The Tub is the herb drying room where they preserve herbs and flowers which are then used within the café and for sale in the shop in the form of herbal teas and other products. This space is also is used as an educational classroom with courses on various subjects including growing herbs, bee keeping, candle making, foraging as well as Festive and seasonal courses.  I was quite bummed that I wasn’t able to attend any of those activities while visiting.  Further out was another garden space with rows of a variety of flowers and herbs.  This space also featured some unique garden art!

These gigantic thistles were a bout the size of my fist.  I asked the guys in the shop about them but they didn’t know any of the specifics about them – so if anyone reading does, I’d love to learn more!

Heading back toward the shop I spotted these graduated retaining walls and thought it was a great simple design.  I may incorporate something like this when I develop that lower area of the yard as well.

The last sight at this location was the owner’s home, which was still being landscaped but was absolutely charming.  It looks like it could have been on Fixer Upper and was a perfect fit for this country setting.

Full from lunch we headed toward our next destination in Cumbria, northern England.  Check out our other Scotland adventures:

And our travels through Iceland on the same trip with Day 1, Day 2, Day 3 and Day 4.

Our Scotland Adventure – Day 4

I’ll be wrapping up recounting our Scotland adventures this week, starting with Day 4 which includes Inverness and Sterling.  Since we had arrived to our lodging after dark the day prior I made sure to get a shot of the building in the morning before we left.  I’m sure at some point it was a grand home, but it has been retrofitted to house guests and functions.  Before we left town I requested that we stop by the castle, which I had spotted on the way back from Loch Ness the evening prior.

Situated on the highest point it’s quite imposing.  Today it is used as the regional court house, so it’s not open to the public for tours but there are plans to convert it into a tourist destination when a new court is constructed. It’s been the scene of several dramas over the course of history including being seized by Bonny Prince Charlie’s forces before the battle of Culloden.  And when Mary, Queen of Scots visited in 1562 and the castle had been entrusted to the Governor’s Captain, who refused Mary entry.  This caused great offence, which led to his execution and head being displayed on the castle wall for all to see.

I circled the castle, enjoying the views of the quiet streets and quaint shops below which had yet to open for the day.

On the other side of the castle was the river Ness which flows to Loch Ness and more views of the city.  While on this side I found a tour group that we had spotted at Culloden the day prior.  I trailed behind them catching bits and pieces of the guide’s descriptions of the local history including stories of Nessie sightings.   He shared the history of St. Andrews Cathedral which is visible across the river.  It was the first new Protestant cathedral  completed in Great Britain after the Reformation. There were supposed to be spires on the two front towers but a lack of funds delayed that portion of construction and they were never completed.

Looking the other direction down River Ness was more shops and pubs, including the Highland House of Fraser, which made my little Outlander fan heart do a pitter patter. 🙂

We had other sights to see so we left Inverness behind and headed toward Sterling, further into the highlands.  Along the way we saw numerous fields of grazing sheep and several more castles poking above the treelines.  I would have loved to stop and investigate them all but we didn’t have time.

We quickly realized that this highway is a major agricultural transit route, as evidenced by the tractors and massive produce loads we spotted along the way.

A few hours later we arrived at Sterling and headed straight for the castle.  It took us a few tries to figure out the right road to be on as the GPS seemed a bit confused.

On our way up the hill toward the castle we spotted this young musician playing the bag pipes in traditional Scottish attire.  We also chuckled at the decal on the back of the tour bus who arrived at the gate just ahead of us.

As we headed inside the castle we had to pause as the guards let a car pass through the narrow tunnel in the fortress’ thick wall.

We purchased our tour tickets and headed inside through another fortified wall.

Inside the castle was a lovely courtyard where activities for children were being held as part of “living history month” including jousting and shinty.

We opted to leave the courtyard to the kids and check out the architecture instead, like this rounded turret lookout.

We headed inside the castle to the rooms inside the outer walls, which each had displays of court life.  Along the way we spotted these fire hooks which would be used to pull down burning beams to keep the fire from spreading.

Down the hall was a display of clothing worn by the King and Queen featuring exquisite fabrics and adornments – including a suggestive addition to the King’s lower half!

There were additional outfits on display further inside the castle.  These were likely worn by courtiers or nobility who were at court.

We headed over to the great hall which had a similar roof structure to the one we’d seen at Edinburgh Castle.  There were several people dressed in period attire as part of the living history activities so we watched them interacting with the other tourists and waited our turn for a photo op.  I got to meet Mary, Queen of Scots and sit at the table next to her for a brief moment.

Next we toured the rooms inside the main building of the castle.  One area held the  crown jewels and relics in a large display case inside of a vault, but no pictures were allowed in this area but you can see a glimpse of it in this clip done by the Scottish historical preservation society.  We also toured Queen Mary’s apartment including the small side room where her son was born.   Several of the other areas where photos were allowed boasted ornately decorated ceilings with carved busts and symbols.  These spaces were part of the procession of rooms that guests would travel through before seeing the King and were meant to impress and showcase his authority, wealth and right to rule.

The throne room was filled with elaborate replica tapestries depicting the hunt of the unicorn beneath the ceiling painted with busts of the King’s heritage.  The tapestry showing the unicorn in a small enclosure is one I remembered as the cover of a historical novel I read a few years ago.

The unicorn symbol continued in other designs around the castle including these paintings above the fire places.  It was often featured with the lion of England to symbolize the joining of the two countries.

Beyond the thrown room was the bedchambers of the King and Queen.  We learned that these spaces were also ceremonial and meant to showcase wealth rather than function. The royals usually did not sleep in these beds, and used smaller chambers attached to the space with less elaborate decor.  One of the side bedrooms had a bed that was not dressed and it was interesting to see it’s construction of rope supports.

We also toured the newer chapel – the last building constructed at the castle.  It was sparsely furnished so I didn’t take many photos here but I was intrigued by this display sign that described the chapel built just outside the castle for James VI’s baptism.  Displays in a museum section of the castle depicted other changes made to the castle over the centuries and changing monarchs.

The displays also included several replicas of the wooden busts seen on the ceiling in the King’s chambers and this interesting quote about nobility.

The tour continued with the kitchens, where sculptures showed the daily activities that took place here.

Signage in the space noted that kitchen work was performed by men rather than women and that there were two kitchens – one for the monarchs and principal courtiers and their servants and another for the rest of the castle’s population.  The signs also depicted the hierarchy of the castle ‘food chain’ and who got what portions.

Back outside we enjoyed a small garden at the back of the castle where Queen Mary likely wandered during her time at the castle.  The view from the walls of this garden were spectacular.

And off in the distance we could see the William Wallace monument, which was our next destination.

As we finished our lap of the castle I noticed these carvings on the newer section of the palace and thought it was interesting that sea creatures were depicted in such a permanent way so far from the coast.

Before we left we stopped into the little gift shop where I found this adorable Highland Coo.  He was quite pricey, but I couldn’t resist that face and so he came home with us, along with one of those gold bells you see in the background!

We headed over to the William Wallace monument but learned that it had closed about a half hour before we arrived. Luckily we soon realized that we could still access the uphill trail to the monument.  We decided to make the trek even though we wouldn’t be able to go inside the monument.

The hike to the monument was certainly UP HILL but there were these fun carvings at each of the switchbacks along the trail which gave us a good excuse to pause and catch our breath.  Each celebrated aspects of Scotland’s resources, history and culture.

I fell in love with the highland coo carving in this grouping.  If I could have fit it in my suitcase I would have brought it home and added it to my gardens!  Maybe I can find something similar online this season instead.

The view of the monument changed as we made our way up the hill, and seeing it through the trees just below the top of the trail was impressive.  We made the final portion of the climb huffing and puffing but satisfied.

Once at the top we took in the detail of the structure including the Victorian style statue on the side of the tower and the thistle design above the doors.

The view across the valley back toward Sterling Castle was breathtaking as the sun began to fade – and not because we were still winded from the trail!

After our bodies remembered how to breath normally, we headed back down the hill and decided to drive back toward the castle to get some photos of the cows we’d seen in the field below the stone walls.  The light was fading fast and the cows were completely uncooperative to my kissy noise calls and faux offers of treats.  Perhaps they knew I was a tourist since I didn’t have the accent in my voice.  Since I wasn’t willing to enter the field where they were at with out a property owner’s permission and there was no one around to ask, this was the best shot I could get.  It’s not horrible, but not exactly what I was wanting either.  It’s tough to work with uncooperative models! 😉

We headed to our hotel for the night to rest up for the next day – a trip to Doune Castle which is Castle Leoch in the Outlander series for a photo shoot with a local photographer.  I’ll be sharing that experience soon, but in the meantime stop by tomorrow for the following day’s visit to Roslyn Chapel!

Check out our other Scotland adventures:

And our travels through Iceland on the same trip with Day 1, Day 2, Day 3 and Day 4.

Enchanted Entertaining at Pier One

Over the weekend I invited a couple of my gal pals to check out a fun event with me at Pier One called Easter Enchantment.  The event featured displays of Easter decor, entertaining tips, a scavenger hunt and gift card giveaways. We were long overdue for a girls day and I figured it would be fun to be on the other side of events for a change since I recently changed positions at work and no longer coordinate the company’s corporate functions.

After signing in, putting our names in for the door prize drawings and getting our scavenger hunt cards we headed over to the far side of the store to check out the mimosa bar display.

The hostess at the bar made us up some mock mimosas with orange juice and sparkling white grape juice, which were surprisingly yummy even without the real bubbly.  She detailed the various ways you could set up a similar bar for Easter brunch.

The little chalkboard sign gave simple directions for guests to create their own mimosas.  She suggested having a variety of juices and fruit toppings so guests could create their own signature drink.  While she didn’t have them out these reusable place card holders that could be used to label the various options available and fit a variety of decor styles and events.  I may just have to pick up a set for our summer gatherings!

The faux peonies they had on display were so pretty that I may go back to pick a few up as well so I can enjoy them all season long without the allergy side effects of having flowers in the house.  And the fact that I don’t have to water them at all is a big plus!

Next we checked out a table scape display, which I somehow forgot to get a shot of.  I blame the mimosa in my hand! 🙂  After that we learned three ways to create fun Easter napkin folds with instruction from one of the store employees.

The first design was this fun rosette which fits perfectly inside a cup.  They had some fancier versions as well with a secondary napkin serving as the green leaves of the rose.

Our first attempts were pretty good so I’d say this is definitely something an entertaining newbie could pull off!

The second design was this fun bunny shape, which required an egg to create.  It’s also a simple design – just fold, roll and wrap around the egg then tie just above it.  From there you can arrange the big ears to stand up or flop over based on your preference.  We used ribbon to tie the ears but I’d suggest trying twine or ribbon for something a bit fancier.

Here’s my bunny fold.  Not too shabby if I do say so myself!  And I love that he has one ear up and one down!

The last design was a little pocket basket.  This one was a bit more complex, but still only took a few steps.  And because it holds an egg you could create egg shaped place cards to use in the fold, which would also serve as a favor for guests.

The example display used one of their spring plush animals, but the gals and I experimented with the bunnies we’d created and thought that was a fun look as well.  They would be great around small potted plants as a favor that guests could take home with them.

After the demonstrations, we browsed the rest of the store displays chatting about one of the gal’s plans to decorate with favorite patterns when she finds a new place soon, sniffing the scented candles and checking out the rest of the Easter decor available.  There was also a fair amount of giggling at each other as we swapped stories about things going on in our lives.

It was time well spent because three of the four of us won gift cards in the drawings and scavenger hunt, and the forth received a discount percentage for a purchase.  I was able to combine my rewards discount with the gift cards I won to get two of these adorable little plush lambs named Juniper for the soon-to-be foster room and this handsome fellow who will be the perfect accent to the vintage cart on our porch this season.  I also eyed these acrylic tumblers for when we eat out on the deck this summer, but decided to hold off for now since there’s still over a foot of snow in our back yard.  Sigh.  It might be the first day of spring on the calendar but here in Alaska we know spring planting and outdoor living is still several weeks away.

If you’re hosting Easter dinner, get the instructions for the napkin folds above plus a few others and more entertaining ideas over at Pier 1’s website so you’re ready to impress your guests.  While you’re there sign up for a free account so you get invites to their next in-store event and can join in the fun!

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